What Is The Correct Genre?

literary GenresMy present project, Norman in the Painting, needs a specific genre. I called it a suspense with paranormal elements but someone said that category didn’t fit. A suspense novel involves imminent danger, high stakes, and threats. Usually the readers and characters know the perpetrator, but the problem is to avoid the impending doom. Waves of frightening peril increase in intensity and lead to the crushing climax, and then at the end  all is resolved.

Multiple threats and murders happen in Norman in the Painting, but the focus is not the arc described above.

Mystery seems like a generic description since mysterious elements are in many books in other genres as well. Specific mystery novels have a puzzle to solve, The protagonist has to find out whodunit in a crime that readers do not see happening. Clues are sprinkled throughout the story and the main character’s clever investigative skills unravel the complicated case.

Norman nor Jill have to track clues to know who did what. They have a problem surrounding their relationship that is not under their control. They have to figure out what to do about it.

A romance novel has a hero and heroine who meet, have conflict at first, develop into a romantic relationship, and then live happily every after. Norman in the Painting ends with a slim possibility of Jill and Norman being happy ever after because of the dangerous situation they agree to embrace. It’s less than a 50/50 chance they will be able to remain together. The required expectation that they will, eliminates my novel from the traditional romance genre.

After exploring all the possibilities, I’m back to my original category: a paranormal romance, which gives the novel a freer ending.

What genre is your novel?

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Antanagoge Rhetorical Device

AntanagogeAntanagoge is a rhetorical device that means: putting a positive point on something negative. (2) answering the charge of an adversary, by a counter charge.

Example: She always forgets my birthday, but she gives me gifts during the year.

He lost his job, but he’s looking forward to spending more time with his family.

Meet Your Happy Chemicals by Loretta Graziano Breuning, PhD

chemicals in the brainI ordered this book, Meet Your Happy Chemicals by Loretta Graziano Breuning, PhD. The following is a summary of what the back book cover states about four brain chemicals. I thought learning about the chemicals would be useful in showing how our POV character or the antagonist could be deficient in

one or more of the chemicals, which could explain some of their behaviors.

Dopamine makes us jump for joy. Dopamine feels great so we try to get more. It rewarded our ancestors’ will to explore.

Endorphin helps us to mask pain. Our ancestors survived from predator attack because endorphin caused them to feel good. Exercise triggers endorphin so we can safely reach home. Laughing or crying triggers it too.

Serotonin is stimulated by the status aspect…the pride of associating with a person of a certain stature. It triggers our need for respect.

Oxytocin is stimulated by touch and by social trust. It flows when we stick with the herd and create social bonds. Herds protected our ancestors from harm.

In my WIP, Norman in the Painting, my protagonist, Jill, has a need for more dopamine and endorphin. Her inner fears cause her to love running. Her goal is to run three miles every day. The endorphin rush makes her feel safe. Her lack of dopamine causes her to have no desire to explore. She spent most of her years close to her hometown and has no interest in travel. I’ll make sure she will produce more dopamine that will help her grow in her character arc.

The antagonist has a severe deficiency in oxytocin and serotonin.

Does your character have a chemical deficiency?

John W. Gardner and John C. Gardner Quotes

John Gardner pic with quote

John W. Gardner, October 8, 1912 to February 16, 2002, was an American statesman. He was a vigorous advocate for social action.

John Gardner accepting for who they are

John C. Gardner

John C Gardner born July 21, 1933 in New York, died September 13, 1982 in a motorcycle accident. He was an American novelist, essayist, literary critic, and university professor. Gardner’s novels range from the award winning October Light in which a crochety New Englander takes a shotgun to his television, to Grendel, a retelling of the Beowulf story by the troubled monster himself: “I observe myself observing what I observe. It startles me…No thread, no frailest hair between myself and the universal clutter!”

John Gardner book cover GrendelThanks to one of my first writing teachers, Jessica Barksdale, Grendel is one of my favorite books. Gardner created a murdering monster that the reader cares about, drawing tears from me several times.

In my search for John C. Gardner quotes, both Gardners were mixed together, many without the middle initial. So I’ll add a few here and you can decide who said what.

john gardner dragonsjohn gardner read five words and see imagesjohn gardner sit on goldjohn gardner poor Grindel

John Gardner realm where spirit more solidjohn gardner transforming but changing nothing

John Gardner life without an eraser

john Gardner Real suspense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some information and Photo credit of John C. Gardner: http://www.todayinliterature.com

Tobias Wolff Quotes

Tobias imageTobias short story quoteTobias getting things right in life

“There are very few professions in which people just sit down and think hard for five or six hours a day all by themselves. Of course it’s why you want to become a writer — because you have the liberty to do that, but once you have the liberty you also have the obligation to do it.”  Tobias Wolff
“In the very act of writing I felt pleased with what I did. There was the pleasure of having words come to me, and the pleasure of ordering them, re-ordering them, weighing one against another. Pleasure also in the imagination of the story, the feeling that it could mean something. Mostly I was glad to find out that I could write at all. In writing you work toward a result you won’t see for years, and can’t be sure you’ll ever see. It takes stamina and self-mastery and faith. It demands those things of you, then gives them back with a little extra, a surprise to keep you coming. It toughens you and clears your head. I could feel it happening. I was saving my life with every word I wrote, and I knew it.”  Tobias Wolff
Tobias fragment beautyTobias writing dangerous pic of book
“I’m a survivor, ” I said. But I didn’t think that claim would carry much weight in an obituary.”  Tobias Wolff

Are You a William Faulkner Fan?

Faulkener at his deskWilliam Faulkner’s Intruder in the Dust was the book chosen for our reading group’s February novel.  We all agreed it was a difficult style to read. He used little punctuation. The pronoun ‘he’ in his long sentences could mean Chick or Lucas or his uncle or any male in the scene. Within the long, long paragraphs, we often couldn’t figure out which ‘he’ talked or took action.

However, we all liked the richness of the setting, and three out of five us appreciated the novel inspite of the writing style.

What Faulkner novels have you read?  What do you think of his writing?

Characters' Flaws and Fears

RiskJill, my protagonist in Norman in the Painting, has a fear of taking risks. She went to the university closest to her hometown although she was accepted in several that were in different states. She wasn’t afraid to leave her parents or to leave her few friends. The small town in the story is a character and that familiar setting is security for her. It’s thirty miles from San Francisco, but she’s never been across the bay. Her parents and sister, involved with the small town’s politics, told Jill the city was unsafe, and had no redeeming qualities so why bother to go there? Gullibility is another of Jill’s flaws. The one time Jill took a risk was in marrying a charming stranger who came to town and who, a year later, tried to kill her.
Part of her character arc is to overcome her fears. In Chapter 18 that I’m writing now, Jill comes to the realization that her fears have prevented her from moving forward in life. However, the risks she now takes will put her and everyone she knows in danger.
What are your character’s flaws and fears?