Scrivener for Pantsers and Plotters?

As we organized the stories in my anthology, Written Across the Genres, my great assistant, Linda Todd, used Scrivener. I bought a copy, took a tutorial, and realized there are several other tutorials available. How to use Scrivener looked manageable as I watched the video, but I’ve procrastinated because of the time involved with the learning curve. I haven’t put anything on it yet.

I’m a pantser, but I see the value of putting the chapters of my growing new novel into a form that would be helpful to keep track of them. I’ve had the experience of editing that got out of hand with 35 chapters in Hada’s Fog and I don’t want a repeat with Norman in the Painting.

Any insights from those of you who use it? Are you a plotter or pantser?

The Earthquakes in the Protagonist's Ordinary World

earthquake fissures in road
Lisa Cron in Wired for Story on page 130, uses the analogy of earthquake fissures that lead to the big one in the life of the protagonist. The “first hairline crack and its resulting offshoots are like fault lines, running through the center of the protagonist’s world, undermining everything. As with an earthquake, the cracks tend to be caused by two opposing forces, with the protagonist caught between them.”

What is the first hairline crack in your story that starts the ultimate change in your protagonist’s life?

Ernest Hemingway Quote

Ernest Hemingway said, “A writer’s problem does not change. He himself changes and the world he lives in changes, but his problem remains the same. It is always how to write truly and having found what is true, to project it in such a way that it becomes part of the experience of the person who reads it.”

The last twenty words are what brings success to a writer. Thanks, Ernest.

Happy Thanksgving

I am thankful that the finish line for my anthology is close. The process has been difficult, yet delightful. I’m grateful to all the writers who submitted entries and their willingness to make revisions. The goal for the book in hand is February 1st.

I appreciate my helpers, particularly Linda Todd. Without her, the book wouldn’t be polished or ready for the press. Stacey Gustafson volunteered to contact writers for their bios etc.  Jordan Bernal, Paula Chinick, and Ann Winfred appeared with their support when I became overwhelmed. Thank you all.