Flash Fiction Book, UP, DO

Flash fiction bookPatricia Flaherty Pagan edited Up, Do, an anthology of thirty-three flash stories by award-winning and emerging writers. The four categories are “Our Hearts”, “Our Bodies”, “Our possible Futures”, and “Our Dreams; Our nightmares.” In the Introduction, Pagan writes:

“I subscribe to the theory that flash fiction is like a geode of a larger narrative. Slicing through the characters and the highest arc of the plot, the flash writer reveals the crystals shining within. Every movement of the blade, every word typed on the page, is crucial.”

Short stories have become popular again with readers. For writers, flash fiction in its required minimal word count is challenging . Pagan captures the essence of the form in her description. When well-written, flash fiction sparkles like gems in the mind.

I opened Up, Do at random and read, “Time Machine” by Melissa Webster. In its brevity, it evoked as strong a response as I had with the three hour movie in theaters now, Interstellar.

Flaherty Pagan earned her MFAW from Goddard College and founded the mission-oriented indie publisher Spider Road Press. Up, Do is available on Amazon and Kindle.

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Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Moe: You're It!

The blog hop continues with Vi Moore, one of the writers I tagged.

Violet's Vibes

Tag was a childhood game that taxed my running skills. I did my best to stay out of reach of the person who was “it,” but my short legs were no match for my long-legged nephews and friends.  When the tagger touched me, he yelled “You’re it!”

When Julaina Kleist-Corwin tagged me in a blog hop, I didn’t run. I accepted the challenge. Meet Julaina.

Julaina Kleist-Corwin teaches creative writing for the City of Dublin, California and has been a presenter at the San Francisco Writers Conference. Julaina has won several short story contests. Her work is published in The California Writers Club Literary Review, Harlequin’s 2012, 2013 Christmas anthologies, and other collections. She writes Women’s Fiction, YA, and multidimensional romantic mysteries.

In Norman and the Painting, the man of Jill’s dreams appears out of a painting. Jill has to discover how to keep him from constantly disappearing back…

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