What Is The Correct Genre?

literary GenresMy present project, Norman in the Painting, needs a specific genre. I called it a suspense with paranormal elements but someone said that category didn’t fit. A suspense novel involves imminent danger, high stakes, and threats. Usually the readers and characters know the perpetrator, but the problem is to avoid the impending doom. Waves of frightening peril increase in intensity and lead to the crushing climax, and then at the end  all is resolved.

Multiple threats and murders happen in Norman in the Painting, but the focus is not the arc described above.

Mystery seems like a generic description since mysterious elements are in many books in other genres as well. Specific mystery novels have a puzzle to solve, The protagonist has to find out whodunit in a crime that readers do not see happening. Clues are sprinkled throughout the story and the main character’s clever investigative skills unravel the complicated case.

Norman nor Jill have to track clues to know who did what. They have a problem surrounding their relationship that is not under their control. They have to figure out what to do about it.

A romance novel has a hero and heroine who meet, have conflict at first, develop into a romantic relationship, and then live happily every after. Norman in the Painting ends with a slim possibility of Jill and Norman being happy ever after because of the dangerous situation they agree to embrace. It’s less than a 50/50 chance they will be able to remain together. The required expectation that they will, eliminates my novel from the traditional romance genre.

After exploring all the possibilities, I’m back to my original category: a paranormal romance, which gives the novel a freer ending.

What genre is your novel?

Meet Your Happy Chemicals by Loretta Graziano Breuning, PhD

chemicals in the brainI ordered this book, Meet Your Happy Chemicals by Loretta Graziano Breuning, PhD. The following is a summary of what the back book cover states about four brain chemicals. I thought learning about the chemicals would be useful in showing how our POV character or the antagonist could be deficient in

one or more of the chemicals, which could explain some of their behaviors.

Dopamine makes us jump for joy. Dopamine feels great so we try to get more. It rewarded our ancestors’ will to explore.

Endorphin helps us to mask pain. Our ancestors survived from predator attack because endorphin caused them to feel good. Exercise triggers endorphin so we can safely reach home. Laughing or crying triggers it too.

Serotonin is stimulated by the status aspect…the pride of associating with a person of a certain stature. It triggers our need for respect.

Oxytocin is stimulated by touch and by social trust. It flows when we stick with the herd and create social bonds. Herds protected our ancestors from harm.

In my WIP, Norman in the Painting, my protagonist, Jill, has a need for more dopamine and endorphin. Her inner fears cause her to love running. Her goal is to run three miles every day. The endorphin rush makes her feel safe. Her lack of dopamine causes her to have no desire to explore. She spent most of her years close to her hometown and has no interest in travel. I’ll make sure she will produce more dopamine that will help her grow in her character arc.

The antagonist has a severe deficiency in oxytocin and serotonin.

Does your character have a chemical deficiency?

Writer's Digest Boot Camp

writers digest universityWriter’s Digest University’s “How to Find and Keep a Literary Agent Boot Camp” is half-way finished for this week. I’ve learned a lot about query letters. We’ve viewed two videos, had two days of two hour discussions, and tomorrow we submit our query letter, first five pages, and synopsis for our agent’s critique. I choose Jill Marr from the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency. The agents’ critiqued materials are due to attendees by April 9th. I’ve connected on social media with several people from Jill’s group discussions. It’s been an inspiring few days.

The boot camps are different from the tutorials that Writer’s Digest offers. I haven’t taken a tutorial, but I’m impressed with this boot camp.

More later. I have to do my Norman in the Painting synopsis.

Rollo May Quotes

Rollo May betray yourselfToday, I opened a book at random and found the following quote by Rollo May:

“The boundaries of our world shift under out feet and we tremble while waiting to see whether any  new form will take the place of the lost boundary or whether we can create out of this chaos some new order.”

The quote reminded me of reading several existentialists’ books when I was in my twenties. Rollo May, 1909-1994, was an American existential psychologist and author of the influential book Love and Will in 1969. Paul Tillich, philosopher and theologian, was a close friend. According to Wikipedia, “Anxiety is a major focus of Rollo May and is the subject of his work “The Meaning of Anxiety”. He defines it as “the apprehension cued off by a threat to some value which the individual holds essential to his existence as a self” (1967, p. 72)…

“One way in which Rollo proposes to fight anxiety is by displacing anxiety to fear as he believes that ‘anxiety seeks to become fear’. He claims that by shifting anxiety to a fear, one can therefore discover incentives to either avoid the feared object or find the means to remove this fear of it.”

Since fear is one of the themes with my WIP, Norman in the Painting, I can use Rollo’s propositions in Jill’s character. Fear is natural to people and writers often use fear in their writing. In Chapter 18, Jill’s underlying fears are challenging her comfort zone. What felt like a simple fear in her past has multiplied to many fears that dash her environmental security.

Here are more quotes by Rollo May:

Rollo May run faster when lostRollo May on mythRollo May imagination not frosting

Has any of Rollo’s quotes inspired you or resonated with what you are writing now?

Writer's Digest University

Boot campFor the first time, I’m taking a class with Writer’s Digest University. “How to Find and Keep a Literary Agent Boot Camp.” It includes a tutorial presented by agents at the Dijkstra Literary Agency explaining the process of submitting to an agent. For two days, two hours each day, there will be Q and A on topic, and we will have time to revise our query letter and the first 5 double-spaced pages of our novels as necessary.

Then, best of all, we send our revisions directly to one of the four agents we are assigned. They will spend 10 days reviewing what we’ve submitted and provide feedback as to what works and what doesn’t. I pitched Norman in the Painting to an agent at the San Francisco Writer’s Conference last month who asked for the manuscript and query. I’m excited to attend the WD Boot Camp so I’ll learn how to present the best query and first five pages possible.

Have any of you taken a WD Boot Camp?

Activewear in My Protagonist's Closet

pink active wearMy Protagonist, Jill Steele, in Norman in the Painting, wears what I called a pink jogging suit. In a critique group, I was told the terminology is activewear, not jogging suit. Apparently, people don’t jog now days, they run. Jill’s sister convinces her to buy new clothes. Jill doesn’t like to go clothes shopping but since Norman is on the scene, she wants to look good for him. The pink activewear is a key to Norman’s vortex. Jill’s new activewear looks like the one here in Landsend’s photo. She hopes it will work as well as the old one did to bring Norman through the painting.

Do you think it will or does she have to wear her old worn pink outfit?

Picture credit to Landsend.com.

Characters' Flaws and Fears

RiskJill, my protagonist in Norman in the Painting, has a fear of taking risks. She went to the university closest to her hometown although she was accepted in several that were in different states. She wasn’t afraid to leave her parents or to leave her few friends. The small town in the story is a character and that familiar setting is security for her. It’s thirty miles from San Francisco, but she’s never been across the bay. Her parents and sister, involved with the small town’s politics, told Jill the city was unsafe, and had no redeeming qualities so why bother to go there? Gullibility is another of Jill’s flaws. The one time Jill took a risk was in marrying a charming stranger who came to town and who, a year later, tried to kill her.
Part of her character arc is to overcome her fears. In Chapter 18 that I’m writing now, Jill comes to the realization that her fears have prevented her from moving forward in life. However, the risks she now takes will put her and everyone she knows in danger.
What are your character’s flaws and fears?